Microsoft on the forefront of hiring people with disabilities, autism

SEATTLE - People with disabilities make up 6 percent of the U.S. workforce, yet they are twice as likely as the rest of the population to be unemployed.With those statistics in mind, Microsoft has made inclusive hiring a priority.“We need diversity,” said Jessica Rafuse, a program manager on the Redmond tech giant’s accessibility team. “We need people who are diverse in abilities.

Microsoft invests heavily in making technology accessible to all

SEATTLE - For Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, improving the lives of those with disabilities is grounded in his own experiences.His 21-year-old son, Zain, has cerebral palsy, is non-verbal and requires a wheelchair to get around.“One of the more gratifying things for me is to see how people view accessibility at Microsoft,” Nadella said.

Microsoft embraces collaboration in $7.5 billion deal for GitHub

Microsoft is paying $7.5 billion for the popular coder hangout GitHub as the maker of Windows further embraces the types of open-source projects it used to shun.CEO Satya Nadella said the all-stock deal pairs Microsoft with the "world's leading software development platform," a destination where developers around the world go to share and review each other's code.As Microsoft built its business on proprietary software such as the Windows operating system, it came to be seen as an antagonist to the open-source philosophy of free software written by a collaborative community of developers.

Microsoft launches $25 million program to use AI for disabilities

Microsoft is launching a $25 million initiative to use artificial intelligence to build better technology for people with disabilities.CEO Satya Nadella announced the new "AI for Accessibility" effort as he kicked off Microsoft's annual conference for software developers.

Supreme Court dismisses Microsoft search case

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Supreme Court has dismissed a dispute between the Trump administration and Microsoft over emails the government wanted as part of a drug trafficking investigation.The justices on Tuesday agreed with both the administration and Microsoft that last month's passage of the Cloud Act as part of a spending bill resolves the dispute and makes the court's intervention unnecessary.The legislation updated a 32-year-old law that governs how authorities can get electronic communications held by technology companies.

Microsoft stops fixing security flaw on PCs with AMD chips

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Microsoft has temporarily stopped fixing a serious security flaw on personal computers powered by certain chips from Advanced Micro Devices because the repair is crippling the affected machines.The suspension will delay efforts to protect the AMD machines from potential intrusions caused by security bugs known as "Spectre" and "Meltdown." The problem primarily threatens devices running on processors from AMD's larger rival, Intel, but also could cause trouble on devices running on other chips.Microsoft began offering updates to its Windows operating system to address the flaw last week, but is withholding the repair from some AMD-powered machines that have been rendered inoperable by its fix.

Supreme Court agrees to take on US-Microsoft dispute over emails

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Supreme Court agreed Monday to take on a major dispute over the government's authority to force American technology companies to hand over emails and other digital information sought in criminal probes but stored outside the U.S.The justices intervened in a case of a federal drug trafficking investigation that sought emails that Microsoft keeps on a server in Ireland.

CEO Satya Nadella makes it clear: Microsoft's home is the Pacific Northwest

SEATTLE - Unlike that other big tech company in the Seattle area, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella made it clear: Microsoft is not looking for a second headquarters outside the Pacific Northwest.Nadella was the headliner Wednesday at the GeekWire Summit, a technology conference in Seattle."I am at least in no hurry to talk about HQ2s (what Amazon is calling its proposed second headquarters)," Nadella said. "I'm happy where we are in Redmond."