Forensic artist works to recreate face of woman killed decades ago

parellaUPDATE April 4, 2014 --  Another update on the mission to identify a woman killed in a fiery crash. This week, Washington State Patrol detective Greg Wilcoxson began visiting truck stops between Tacoma and the crash site, posting fliers and asking for anyone who may think they know her name to contact them. Investigators think she may be Native American based on people who saw her before she and long haul truck driver Lester Harvel died in the accident on I-5 in 1991. Her body was exhumed in January. Then forensic artist Natalie Murry created a sketch of her. It's generated many leads, even one from Canada. Now, Wilcoxson hopes the flyers he's handing out finally solves the mystery of who she is. "We will continue to post the truck flyers along the route of the truck," he said. "We will contact the truck stops and weigh stations and ask them if they will post this flyer in their facilities as well." He is also going to send the fliers to law enforcement agencies and the media in cities along the route between Washington and Missouri where Harvel's trip started. UPDATE March 21, 2014 -- The woman was exhumed in Cowlitz County on January 8th thanks to support from the Puyallup Tribe. Investigators think she may be Native American based on people who saw her before she and long haul truck driver Lester Harvel died in the accident on I-5 in 1991. This forensic sketch has since generated many leads. Detectives are comparing case notes with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police because the woman matches the description of one of their missing persons. The same goes for another missing person in North Dakota. WSP Detective Greg Wilcoxson also heard from someone in Salem, Oregon who thinks she resembles a woman who went missing in may of 1991 in Cowlitz County. He says witnesses who saw her back in 1991 think the image created by forensic artist Natalie Murry is a good likeness. "He thought that the sketch resembled what he had recalled with the exception, he remembered her hair having a part down the middle of her head, but overall he thought the sketch looked like a good match from what he remembered," Wilcoxson said. This week, Wilcoxson is planning to visit truck stops between Tacoma and the crash site to post fliers and ask for anyone else who may think they know her name to contact them. He is also going to send the fliers to law enforcement agencies and the media in cities along the route between our state and Missouri where Harvel's trip started. Investigators are still waiting on DNA results that the Cowlitz County coroner is working on getting and think they may hold the key to positively identifying her. She had a gap in her lower front teeth and severe scoliosis. If you remember someone like that in 1991 who disappeared, call crime stoppers or the Washington State Patrol so investigators can solve this mystery and return her to her family. SEATTLE March 14, 2014 -- A 20-year-old mystery is a step closer to being solved. Washington State Patrol investigators now have new clues that may help identify a woman killed in a fiery truck crash on I-5 in Cowlitz County. Forensic artist Natalie Murry is reconstructing what she thinks the unidentified female may have looked like. “I love the part where you start seeing the features come out and you start seeing the face,” Murry said. The mystery woman was riding with long-haul trucker, Lester Harvel, when they were both killed after slamming into the back of another truck in Cowlitz County. “It was a little bit difficult in the sense that there was a fire in the semi and things happen to bone in fire, and so I had to make adjustments to that, to the shape of her cranium because it had changed from what it normally would have been,” said Murry. Her reconstruction is part science, part art and based on a witness description of the woman. “She was not what they would call pretty, but she was attractive," Murry said. "She had long, straight dark hair and high cheek bones and was wearing an earring with a feather and so they surmise that she might be Native American.” State Patrol detective Greg Wilcoxson and Tim Davidson, the Cowlitz County coroner, exhumed the victim’s body in January. Wilcoxson says,  “The driving force is just that all these years later, 22-plus years, we have a grave without a headstone  or even a marker of any type and it’s sad to know that she’s never been identified.” State anthropologist Kathy Taylor rebuilt her skull, then Murry photographed it and uploaded the images into her computer. She can spend up to 20hours building this digital reconstruction. And for the very first time, we are getting look at what this unidentified woman may have looked like. Natalie knows it may not be an exact replica, but is hoping that it’s close enough that a family member or friend might be able to identify her. “The main thing is that it sparks recognition," Murry said. The unidentified female has bad teeth, according to Murry, that included a gap in her front bottom teeth. If you know anything about the identity of this woman or think you recognize her, please call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.